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Is This a Dog Liver Problem

by Heidi
(WV)

Shyann has always been a healthy dog, but in the past month she has lost alot of weight. She is a 11 year old Bolder Collie Blue Heller mix.


I can feel her spine and ribs, but she is eating. She doesn't have a cough, but she sounds wheezy through the nose (not enough that she has to breath through her mouth) and now over the past three days she has a yellow gunky discharge from both eyes. Definitely there is a loss of energy and she has been sleeping alot. No diarrhea, but sometimes there is a bile looking watery vomit, about once a week.

Any ideas?

Editor Suggestions Dog Liver Problem

The canine liver has various functions to perform. These functions are related to almost all physiological systems in the dog body such as waste removal, detoxification, the digestive system and many other organs in the body.

Symptoms such as lethargy, partial or complete anorexia, weight loss, progressive disease, reduced energy levels, vomiting and finally yellowish discharge from the eyes indicates a dog liver problem.

This condition can be anything, which can only be confirmed with a detailed clinical examination and laboratory diagnosis. Unfortunately, we can't confirm that it is a canine liver problem over the Internet, however,we can recommend some supportive measures and details you must know when discussing the problem with your veterinarian.

Dog weight loss and possibly a reduced appetite will result in a decline in your dogs energy levels and thus symptoms such as lethargy, sleeping and loss of body condition will become more severe. Along with these symptoms, if vomiting continues and diarrhea occurs in the near future, this will severely dehydrate your dog, possibly leading to a medical emergency.

The canine liver has to perform critical tasks such as detoxification and waste removal, thus if the dog liver problem is not diagnosed and treated properly, this will not only lead to hepatic cellular failure, but also associated organs will become negatively affected.

Thus, it is recommended that you should consult a veterinarian right away for a detailed clinical examination and laboratory diagnosis. Needed laboratory tests will include blood work, biochemical profiles, liver enzymes' detection and x-rays (to look at anatomical features of the liver).

Once the canine liver condition (or any other problem if not the liver) is confirmed, it should be treated specifically and you should carefully follow the veterinarian's instructions, since therapy may continue for weeks to months.

For now, we can only suggest a few supportive remedies, which will help to not only restore your dogs energy levels, but that will also support liver physiology (condition). Remember, these are only for support. The exact condition should be confirmed and treated accordingly. To restore your dogs energy levels we suggest you try Energy Tonic, and to support the liver, we suggest the product Liver Aid.

Best of luck to you and your and dog. Please keep us up to date on the diagnosis you receive from your veterinarian and if in fact this is a canine liver problem.

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Sep 06, 2011
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liver failure
by: sarah

Misha is 13 and got diagnosed with liver failure last October. She has been really well until recently although she seems herself. She seems to be producing a rather lot of bile. I have consequently reduced the treats and only give her food that's hers. She also seems to be slavering loads.

Any advice would certainly help

May 06, 2010
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Great Article!
by: Anonymous

My dog was diagnosed with a liver disease last year. I was mortified. I wish I had read your article back then! I got my dog taking Canine Milk Thistle for Dog Liver Disease. It has helped to detoxify and tone his liver. I'd recommended it to anyone whose dog has liver disease.

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